March for Choice – 30 September 2017

Saturday, September 30th marked the 6th Annual March for Choice. 

Women, men, children (even pets!) from all over Ireland gathered on Saturday to march through Dublin city centre to show support for the Abortion Rights Campaign and the ongoing #Repealthe8th drive. 

If you are not familiar with the history of this issue in Ireland to date, there is a great explainer video here

With a referendum finally announced for mid-2018, the pressure is on now, more than ever, to inform people as much as possible on this subject, and to make sure that people know exactly what it is that their vote will change.

Talk to (at!) your friends, family, colleagues, neighbours, anyone who’s willing to listen – it’s too important not to. 

Simply put, repealing the 8th Amendment of the Irish constitution will demonstrate that the Irish people trust women to make the right choices for themselves. Repealing the 8th Amendment will not legalise abortion, despite what others might have you believe… 

Last Saturday’s march was something I was really happy to be able to take part in. Obviously everybody on Saturday would have preferred that there were no need for a march, but there is. Personally, I was a little overwhelmed by the sheer number of people that turned up – all in amazing spirits. The chanting, singing, drumming and laughter (there were some really witty signs!) created such a beautiful atmosphere, and I felt so proud of everybody there. It was clear to all that it’s an issue that is close to a lot of people’s hearts.

I won’t ramble on any longer, as I’m sure I’ll write more on this again, but for now, here are some photos of Saturday’s march, along with a few shots from the #Strike4Repeal gathering back in March of this year. 

If you want to sign the petition, you can do so here.

If you want to donate to the campaign, you can do that here

If you spot yourself in any of these photos and would like me to take it down, please just message me on sharonadotie at gmaildotcom or on Instagram (@sharonaie

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Street Art or Graffitti?

On a recent trip to Greece for a wedding of two friends of ours, we spent an entire day wandering around the streets of Athens.

My husband lived in Athens for ten years, and as a result knows the city quite well, and would in many respects regard it as home.

Having been there myself several times, I too have come to love the city.

It’s hustle and bustle, the noisy comings and goings, the “ella malaka” to be heard everywhere over the sound of traffic – I had come to like this within an ancient city with so much to offer.

Leo and myself at the Acropolis in Athens back in 2010.

Our most recent trip both saddened and angered me.

I was sad to see this once proud city slipping to its knees, a shadow of its former self. The atmosphere in the city is tense – people who once walked with eyes firmly ahead, proud of their city and what it stood for, now walk with their heads down, eyes downcast on the ground. The city is much quieter than when I have been previously, everybody just seems to want to keep their head down and stay out of trouble. Yet there is a undertone in other parts of the city, where you feel a vague undercurrent of something much darker at work. People are angry, and a lot of that anger has materialised on walls, buildings, windows, billboards – any surface available – where the feelings of Athenians are expressed in the absence of any real presence of anybody listening to what they have to say.

Theodor Adorno said

The task of art today is to bring chaos into order.

If Adorno was right, then the artists of Athens will have to put in a good few extra hours.

My question is – does this freedom of expression help or hinder? Does a daube of paint expressing hatred of the police assist the people in getting on with their lives? Or is it simply inciting more bad feeling?

Some of the articulations are certainly beautiful, and created by genuine talent. Some messages however may be doing this city more harm than good.

I for one, hope that things will only get better for these wonderful, warm, funny and proud people, and certainly, sooner rather than later.